Weekly Bulletin 28 July 2019

Posted on Posted in Weekly Bulletin

THE FAMILY MASS
preparation group is taking a break for August so the next Family Mass will be on Sunday 1st September

SEE THE MESSENGER FOR JULY AND AUGUST
with articles by Eileen Kane on the four paintings in Gardiner St. church. A good read from one of Ireland’s foremost art experts who has a great love of our church.

PARISH OFFICE
From Tuesday 6th to Monday 19th of August, the Parish Office will be open only Monday to Friday from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm.

COLLECTIONS:
Last week’s Collections, Church € 597 Share € 392.The Blue Bag is for the Church Collection (St Francis Xavier’s Gardiner Street), The red bag is for Share.
Thanks for your generosity!

VOLUNTEERS: ST VINCENT DE PAUL
urgently need volunteers in the areas of Dublin, Wicklow and Kildare to work in assistance with individuals and families for just once a week. This will be for about 3 hours, day or night, (whatever suits you best). Full training and support provided – for more information Tel: 01 8198405 or
visit: www.SVP.ie / volunteer@svp.ie

31ST JULY- FEAST OF ST. IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA
On Wednesday 31st July we celebrate the feast day of St Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of The Jesuits. A special mass will be celebrated on this day at Gardiner Street Church, and our homilist will be Fr. Micheál MacGréil. Mass will be celebrated at 11.00am with tea and coffee served afterwards.

SAINT IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA
“Saint Ignatius of Loyola was the founder of the Society of Jesus; through his extraordinary life, his teachings, and his example he created an order which over the last five centuries has created innovators and thinkers and spread faith and charity across the globe.
In 1521, while defending the castle of Pamplona against an invading French force, he was wounded, struck in the leg by a cannonball. While recovering from this injury in his father’s castle, Loyola began reading religious works on the life of Jesus and on lives of saints, such as Francis of Assisi. This period of convalescence allowed him time to reflect, and he found within himself a desire to help those in need and to spread the word of God.
The Jesuits were founded with the ideals of serving those in need, wherever in the world their service was best required. Following the founding of the Society of Jesus, Saint Ignatius spent much of his time in Rome, where he governed the rapidly growing order and trained new Jesuits until his death in 1556.”

A NOTE ON IGNATIAN SPIRITUALITY
“In his book What Does It All Mean? Richard Leonard SJ refers to Ignatius’ wisdom on helping people tune into their deepest desires. “Ignatius says the spiritual quest starts with our desires, asking, ‘What do I really want in my life?’ Our desires are pivotal to our search. We often look for all the right things in all the wrong places, and some pay for it for the rest of their lives. Unlike what many people think today, Ignatius would not rate ‘being happy’ as the most important desire to have and possess… When he emerged from the darkness of that cave [at Manresa], Ignatius knew that happiness would be the welcome by-product of living out the highest goals in life: to be the most loving, hopeful, and faithful person possible.”

Saint Ignatius of Loyola

For more information about Ignatian Spirituality see:

What is Ignatian Spirituality?
https://www.ignatianspirituality.com/

Ignatian Way: A series of presentations based on materials written by Brian Grogan, SJ, of the Irish Jesuits
https://www.ignatianspirituality.com/what-is-ignatian-spirituality/the-ignatian-way/

The Spiritual Exercises:

The Spiritual Exercises